Week 6 – Scratch

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In order to develop digital fluency and not just digital literacy, as teachers we need to understand the vast array of different technologies available. Exposing these different technologies to students ensures their digital experiences will be expanded and challenged (Howell, 2012). One such different technology is Scratch. Scratch indeed expanded my personal digital experience by creating an animation that included movement, sound and text. I thoroughly enjoyed creating my animation. It was inspiring to preview the animation as it was being created, which increased my motivation to try new things and just “give it a go”. I believe many students would react similarly and enjoy the experimental nature of the tool.

Watch this informative video to find out more about Scratch, and interestingly, what some kids think of the program.

(Chris Betcher, 2013)

Using Scratch in future I’d like to experiment by creating a game – perhaps a troll will not let a rabbit cross the bridge until it has answered a mathematical question. However using Scratch is probably not so much about the end product and how that is used – it is more about the process of creation. The problem solving and mathematical skills, and the logic and reasoning used by the creator in order to program the animation (Betcher, 2010). Again students are learning by doing, which appears to be a common theme in the digital learning arena.

References

Betcher, C. (2010, October 26). Teaching kids to think using Scratch. [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://chrisbetcher.com/2010/10/teaching-kids-to-think-using-scratch/

Chris Betcher. (2013, March 9). Teaching Kids To Think Using Scratch [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qwbVGUeW2w#t=67

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital pedagogies for collaboration and creativity. South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford.